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Christöphilax - The Work Of Christöphilax In The Age Of Mechanical Reproduction FLAC album


Performer: Christöphilax
Genre: Electronic
Title: The Work Of Christöphilax In The Age Of Mechanical Reproduction
Style: Experimental
FLAC version ZIP size: 1989 mb
MP3 version ZIP size: 1325 mb
WMA version ZIP size: 1462 mb
Rating: 4.4
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The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction (1935, Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit), by Walter Benjamin, is an essay of cultural criticism which proposes that the aura of a work of art is devalued by mechanical reproduction. The subject and themes of the essay have much influenced the fields of art history and architectural theory, and of cultural studies and media theory.

the work of christöphilax in the age of mechanical reproduction' kept going in my head for some while after I turned the stereo of. - - Adrian Shaw (Bevis Frond, Hawkwind, Magic Muscle & The Crazy World of Arthur Brown). christöphilax as formative of the function of the I' might end up being the soundtrack to your mental collapse. - Philip Stone (Splendid Magazine).

The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Our fine arts were developed, their types and uses were established, in times very different from the present, by men whose power of action upon things was insignificant in comparison with ours. But the amazing growth of our techniques, the adaptability and precision they have attained, the ideas and habits they are creating, make it a certainty that profound changes are impending in the ancient craft of the Beautiful. With lithography the technique of reproduction reached an essentially new stage. This much more direct process was distinguished by the tracing of the design on a stone rather than its incision on a block of wood or its etching on a copperplate and permitted graphic art for the first time to put its products on the market, not only in large numbers as hitherto, but also in daily changing forms.

Our fine arts were developed, their types and uses were established, in times very different from the present, by men whose power of action upon things was insignificant in comparison with ours. Despite the socio-cultural effects of reproduction-art upon the original work of art, Benjamin said that the uniqueness of a work of art is inseparable from its being embedded in the fabric of tradition, which separates the original work of art from the reproduction. He also discusses the ritualization of art-reproduction and the emancipation of the work of art from.

Mechanical reproduction of a work of art, however, represents something new. Historically, it advanced intermittently and in leaps at long intervals, but with accelerated intensity. The Greeks knew only two procedures of technically reproducing works of art: founding and stamping. This unique existence of the work of art determined the history to which it was subject throughout the time of its existence. This includes the changes which it may have suffered in physical condition over the years as well as the various changes in its ownership. Around 1900 technical reproduction had reached a standard that not only permitted it to reproduce all transmitted works of art and thus to cause the most profound change in their impact upon the public; it also had captured a place of its own among the artistic processes. For the study of this standard nothing is more revealing than the nature of the repercussions that these two different manifestations – the reproduction of works of art and the art of the film – have had on art in its traditional form.

With mechanical reproduction, which appears in its most radical forms in film and photography, millions of images of an original are circulated, all of which lack the authentic aura of their source. This process both affects and is the effect of changing social conditions in which all previously unique and sacred institutions have become equal (223). The general willingness to accept a reproduction in place of the original also signifies an unwillingness to participate in the ritualistic aesthetics and politics of earlier times. Other more recent critical work has explored Benjamin’s arguments in the context of contemporary debates about the unprecedented levels of participation in art that novel forms of electronic media offer (Ziarek 209-25).

PROGRESSIVE REACTION (SOCIAL SIGNIFICANCE OF ART) Mechanical reproduction of art changes the reaction of the masses toward art: Progressive ( positive) reaction toward a Chaplin movie (by the masses) Reactionary ( incomprehension) attitude toward a Picasso painting (by the masses) Popular culture works with hegemonic forces because it is shaped by mass audience response in a feedback loop (lack of appreciation.

Tracklist

1 Donald Rumsfeld In Hell 5:42
2 A Song For The Old Europe 5:40
3 PMCs 6:45
4 Dante's Disco Inferno 7:02
5 War Requiem 5:41
6 Alessio Vinci In Hell 6:00
7 Carlo Giuliani 6:37
8 Le Degré Zéro De La Voiture, Ou La Mort Du Piéton 5:02
9 Bliar 5:11
10 Occupied Territories 6:32
11 Guantanamera 8:10
12 Glam Racquet 6:20
13 Theme From Christöphilax 4:01